KurtosisKurtosis

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      under review  ·  1232 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
      KurtosisKurtosis supported this idea  · 
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        564 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Texas, I and probably most other FT supporters agree with you in principal, but in terms of what's feasible we think the FT is more likely to actually get passed. Further, they're not mutually exclusive. I suspect one reason our tax system is so complex is to preclude many people from understanding it and agitating for changing it, a situation the very simple FT would eliminate.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Texas, I and probably most other FT supporters agree with you in principal, but in terms of what's feasible we think the FT is more likely to actually get passed. Further, they're not mutually exclusive. I suspect one reason our tax system is so complex is to preclude many people from understanding it and agitating for changing it, a situation the very simple FT would eliminate.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Good points, Grand, I wonder about the unintended consequences of such a large change too. But then I consider the complexities and unintended consequences of the current system and figure I'd be willing to take that chance. I see no better incentive for recapitalizing American industry (real, not paper, wealth), which is the only way to grow our way out of the insane debt we recently taken on.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Good points, Grand, I wonder about the unintended consequences of such a large change too. But then I consider the complexities and unintended consequences of the current system and figure I'd be willing to take that chance. I see no better incentive for recapitalizing American industry (real, not paper, wealth), which is the only way to grow our way out of the insane debt we recently taken on.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Sorry for all the double posts, my browser/computer has an issue where clicking the Post/Submit button sends 2 clicks instead of 1.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Sorry for all the double posts, my browser/computer has an issue where clicking the Post/Submit button sends 2 clicks instead of 1.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Further, most economists and policy analysts now agree that consumption taxes are generally better than taxes on production. FT just extends that paradigm to its ultimate logical conclusion. I'd be more than willing to deal with higher prices on new goods (used are excluded) in exchange for making America the global mecca for business, production, and outsourcing.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Further, most economists and policy analysts now agree that consumption taxes are generally better than taxes on production. FT just extends that paradigm to its ultimate logical conclusion. I'd be more than willing to deal with higher prices on new goods (used are excluded) in exchange for making America the global mecca for business, production, and outsourcing.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Having quibbled over those details, the fact that the Fair Tax removes all taxes and compliance costs from the production process is more than enough for me to support 110%. Why should Asia, Eastern Europe, or wherever be the global mecca for manufacturing, production, and real (not paper or speculative) wealth creation, when America can do even better with this kind of tax reform?

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Having quibbled over those details, the fact that the Fair Tax removes all taxes and compliance costs from the production process is more than enough for me to support 110%. Why should Asia, Eastern Europe, or wherever be the global mecca for manufacturing, production, and real (not paper or speculative) wealth creation, when America can do even better with this kind of tax reform?

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        If any of those embedded taxes are instead reallocated to salaries (most likely the income tax), then that 22% embedded tax is not fully erased, just shifted. Eg, 16% is removed, 8% reallocated to salaries, then 23% FT is applied for an 23-16 = 7% across the board price increase. This is one of the issues discussed in their latest book 'Fair Tax: The Truth: Fair Tax Answers Its Critics".

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        If any of those embedded taxes are instead reallocated to salaries (most likely the income tax), then that 22% embedded tax is not fully erased, just shifted. Eg, 16% is removed, 8% reallocated to salaries, then 23% FT is applied for an 23-16 = 7% across the board price increase. This is one of the issues discussed in their latest book 'Fair Tax: The Truth: Fair Tax Answers Its Critics".

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Additionally, if previously withheld income tax is reallocated to paychecks, price levels *will* rise. FT removes the 22% embedded taxes and replaces them with a 23% consumption tax (both calculated inclusively), for an ostensible, marginal 1% price rise. However that assumes that all of those embedded taxes - income, payroll, ss taxes, etc. are reallocated to production cost decrease.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Additionally, if previously withheld income tax is reallocated to paychecks, price levels *will* rise. FT removes the 22% embedded taxes and replaces them with a 23% consumption tax (both calculated inclusively), for an ostensible, marginal 1% price rise. However that assumes that all of those embedded taxes - income, payroll, ss taxes, etc. are reallocated to production cost decrease.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        I think it's more likely companies are going to keep the payroll tax themselves, while reallocating workers' income tax to their paychecks. Same with compliance cost reduction, companies will keep that themselves rather give it to their workers (unless they're in a bidding war for talent in the labor market, but that's only at the high end).

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Also, I don't entirely buy the 'it will make paychecks 30% larger', there are too many complexities involved to make that blanket statement. For example, for people in the lower income brackets who pay a ~15% income tax to see a 30% paycheck increase, not only would their company have to reallocate that 15% to their salary, it would also have to reallocate the unseen payroll tax to their salary.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        So instead of exemptions, FT calculates the standard cost of necessities for a person, assumes everyone purchases those necessities (both rich and poor), and prebates 23% of that back to everyone. Much cleaner that way, though it's certainly easy to see how some would perceive it as socialism at first glance.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        I didn't mean to imply the Fair Tax is an overcharge on everything. Only that it overtaxes spending on necessities. FT requires that necessities be exempt, but how do you decide exactly which products are exempt and which aren't? Doing so would invite the army of lawyers and lobbyists back to get their clients' products exempted, defeating one of the main points of the FT.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        "There is no way to dispute that. Seriously how is it that republicans are supporting this garbage?"

        It's easy to dispute if you actually understand it. I know Conservatives are touchy about socialism now that the Dems are fully in control, but Ayn Randian knee-jerk reactions to great reform ideas without fully understanding them are self-defeating.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Every person spends the same on bare necessities, hence everyone is equally overtaxed on those necessities under the Fair Tax, hence everyone receives the exact same amount in overpayment rebate (prebate). It is NOT wealth redistribution.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Listen people, the prebate is NOT wealth redistribution. One of the flaws of the Fair Tax (nothing's perfect, at least they're honest and upfront about it) is that it overcharges people for necessities (food, shelter, clothes, etc.). However, since that spending is fairly constant and predictable it can be rebated *in advance*. Hence, the prebate is just an advance rebate for tax overpayment.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        @bandito: those 40 cents on the dollar are what the Fair Tax calls 'embedded taxes', and all are eliminated under the Fair Tax, and replaced by a roughly equivalent Consumption Tax. The net result is same or slightly higher price levels (depending on factors like whether previously withheld income tax is reallocated to salaries or to reducing production costs), and no taxes on business or labor

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        "So will 23% fairtax fund two wars, a new medicare drug plan, rebuild America's infrastruc..."
        JAC, actually yes. The solution to all those problems is to rebuild and recapitalize our productive industry, and grow our way out of these problems with real wealth creation (not paper 'wealth' creation or services wealth transfer). Fair Tax does more to enable that than anything else govt could do.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        brianewart, Fair Tax is far superior to the Flat Tax. Just read the book. I thought the Flat Tax was better too, until reading the book. Fair Tax solves so many problems the Flat Tax does not, there is just no comparison. All in the book.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Jim2000, read the book, not the website, it explains the prebate better. It's necessary b/c the poor are paying taxes on necessities like food and clothes that you don't want to tax the poor on. You could exempt food and clothes from taxes, but then you'll get lobbyists scrambling for more exemptions. The prebate is the best way to ensure the poor are not taxed. Again, read the book.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        LHohyeah, what you describe is what the Fair Tax does, just in a less-intrusive way. Read the book. http://www.amazon.com/FairTax-Answering-Critics-Neal-Boortz/dp/0061540463

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Shane, I'm not sure RP has actually read the Fair Tax details, since it not only abolishes the Income Tax, but all other Federal Taxes as well, in favor of a single tax with little to no compliance costs, that shifts the tax burden from production to consumption, and that makes it simple to reduce tax revenue back to a 90s level (just reduce the % rate). How can he be against that?

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Again, to the critics, please just read the book:

        http://www.amazon.com/FairTax-Answering-Critics-Neal-Boortz/dp/0061540463

        Many of your critiques are flawed or uninformed, I don't have time to belabor everything the book already covers in clear detail, so please just do yourself and the nation a favor and read it. I promise you it will be $10 and a few hours well spent.

        KurtosisKurtosis supported this idea  · 
        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        The book also clarifies a few things, for example the wage/price tradeoff. If workers get the previously witheld income tax added to their salaries, aggregate prices will rise. If workers' take-home pay remains constant and that witholding is instead allocated to reducing the cost of production, aggregate prices will remain roughly constant as well. The book covers that tradeoff in more detail.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Easy guys, we're all on the same side here. I certainly won't fault anyone for working long hours in these days economic uncertainty.

        Yuma please just keep in mind that the book covers the details of the tax and many potential positive ramifications as well, and as someone open to real tax reform, it would be very interesting to you.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        3102Yuma, please please just read the book. If you are open to the idea of the flat tax, the Fair Tax will blow you away. I believe they answer your question about black markets in the book, too. Iirc, it is that the Fair Tax *only* applies to new goods, not used goods or services. Corporations aren't going to pull all their new products out of retail outlets and websites to sell underground.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        It's not 'composed by average Americans'. The more you spend, the more tax you pay. Hence the wealthy pay the most. Read the book.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Oops, posting system is a little screwy this morning, thought one of my posts didn't go through so retyped it.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        What's left is no IRS, a single Federal tax collected by already-existing state point-of-sale sales-tax systems, and no tax compliance costs on *any* Federal taxes. How is that less conservative than getting rid of just the Income tax, yet leaving a tangled mess of other Federal taxes like estate and capgains?

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        The result: No IRS, no tax compliance costs of *any* for Federal taxes, just a consumption tax collected by already-existing state sales tax systems on new goods only, not used goods (used cars, resold homes, etc. all excluded) or services. How is that less conservative than just getting rid of the Income tax only yet leaving a tangled mess of other Federal taxes, like estate and capgains?

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Storm, the Fair Tax guys thought about that already. Then they took it a step further and wondered if it were possible not just to abolish the IRS and Income Tax, but *all* federal taxes: gift, estate, capital gains, alternative minimum, Social Security, Medicare, self-employment, etc., and replace them all with a single consumption tax on new goods only administered by state sales tax systems.

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Jim, read the book. It's the least intrusive national tax system *ever* devised. You'll also find the originators of the Fair Tax agree with everything you say, but have well-considered reasons for not including all you/they want in the Fair Tax. http://www.amazon.com/FairTax-Answering-Critics-Neal-Boortz/dp/0061540463

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Ammendment X, larrywarrick, takingastand, stormcommander, & other critics, please just read the book already. Your comments clearly show you haven't, you're making incorrect assumptions based on a passing, erroneous understanding of the Fair Tax. Trust me, it will be a few hours well-spent: http://www.amazon.com/FairTax-Answering-Critics-Neal-Boortz/dp/0061540463

        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

        Guys please read the book before criticizing. It is painfully obvious from many of the criticisms above that the critics have read about it on a blog somewhere, but have done no due diligence and actually read the book. You only need the most recent book, it covers everything in the older one and more: http://www.amazon.com/FairTax-Answering-Critics-Neal-Boortz/dp/0061540463

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          3 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
          KurtosisKurtosis shared this idea  · 
        • 47 votes
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            under review  ·  36 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
            KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

            Problem is, the GoP has no more fiscal conservatism or small government cred. You gotta rebuild that cred by having GoP reps and senators actually do big things consistently along those lines. Too late now w/ the Dems in the control, the GoP won't be setting the agenda for a long time. Do this campaign now, and anyone who has been paying attention the past 8yrs will just laugh.

          • 292 votes
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              75 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
              KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

              Eg, both parties are equally bought, and are pawns of the international banking industry.

              KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

              Colorz, the Republican Party is just as much responsible for your global takeover. Such takeovers use the dialectic strategy - create a crisis, then provide a solution that remakes the world under your preferred criteria. Some of the enablers and architects of the crisis were Republicans, namely Phil Graham & the Graham-Leech-Bliley Act, and Bush's reckless spending.

              KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

              Well written. As soon as I get some votes back, will add to this one.

            • 4,841 votes
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                134 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                Frick, yeah, it also occurs to me based on the front page that the creators of the site are more interested brainstorming ideas for tactics, rather than re-evaluating fundamental philosophy. Since about half the suggestions on the front page are the latter, I wonder if maybe it has turned into something they didn't intend it to be. No idea what's going on...

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                kathleen, angst much? lol. Fyi, the Internet isn't the best place to work out your personal issues. Let me help you, maybe you can find some help here:

                http://www.psywww.com/resource/selfhelp/sexual.html

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                kathleenharris, if it was boring to you then I suggest you go back to playing xbox. Get your adhd fix somewhere else, the adults are talking.

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                Benjamin, I agree. I provided about 6 paragraphs worth of specifics, but the site mods deleted it all this morning / yesterday and left only the list. No idea why they censored my suggestion and none of the others on the front page. Something is fishy. Luckily I saved a copy at home, and will repost the specifics in the comments shortly.

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                indie, what did I misspell?

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                PS - in my original post I tried to elaborate on *why* #1 - #4 are good ideas, and provide reasons for them, and consequences of abandoning them. I didn't just copy and paste from somebody's blog, I took the time to think through that post. I don't see why you felt the need to censor it (and no others on the front page). It got 1770+ votes in its original form, now its neutered.

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                Great, delete 90% of my suggestion. Thanks mods/site-owners. Was that b/c of the curt email I sent asking you to wake up and get rid of the 'truck nutz' trolls? Why delete most of my post, and not large portions of several even longer ones? Without the content I so painstakingly re/wrote, it's just another 'be conservatives, embrace ron paul' suggestion. So much understanding the Internet.

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                Yeah, I remember that rationalization for deficit spending from the early days of the Bush admin. I guess we'll see over the next 5-10yrs how that plays out...

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                But deficit-funded tax cuts are either spent or invested. If spent, it's like buying on a credit card. We all have to pay interest on money that is gone and has no ROI. That initial expenditure may stimulate the economy in the near-term, but the long-term cost cancels it, unless the GDP grows at faster than debt interest. That assumption works great, until it doesn't, like right now.

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                More debt relative to ability to pay means your lenders incur more and more risk of lending to you, hence they demand higher compensation for that risk in the form of higher interest rates. The US has so far eluded this phenomenon due to a variety of factors - our currency is the world reserve currency, our economic liabilities are less than those of Europe, and we are more stable than China.

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                I agree w/ most of what you're saying frick, but not the cutting taxes part. Deficit-funded tax-cuts don't always spur growth. The best that can do is purchase growth in the near term at the cost of long-term problems. Anytime any entity, be it a person, corporation, or government, goes deeper and deeper into debt, that debt gets more and more expensive for them in the form of interest rates.

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                (cont) So the currency dilemna is, how do you create a hard currency system, rather than a debt-backed inflationary fiat currency system, that is immune from manipulation by super rich market players? But yes, our debt-backed inflationary currency is a stealth tax from Americans and our Govt. to creditors, eg to Wall St. and international lenders who hold our govt bonds that back our currency.

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                (cont) So the problem w/ gold is the US doesn't produce enough domestically, and the world gold supply is small enough that its price can be manipulated by international investors, allowing manipulation of gold-backed currencies by foreign interests. Ron Paul talks about currency competition - including gold and silver - as an interesting alternative: http://thenewliberty.com/?p=435

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                Stuki - Gold, or a hard currency system in general should do that theoretically. In practice there are problems, though. For example, from the late 80s to about '95, Greenspan tracked interest rates to gold prices. However, he quit that scheme in '95 when he observed that gold prices were being manipulated in order to manipulate US interest rates.

                KurtosisKurtosis supported this idea  · 
                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                ...cont: This kind of wealth distribution trend has caused social instability and revolutions in the past, and was one of the primary causes of both the French revolution and the rise of Marxism & Communism in Europe. It would be wise and prudent for the GoP to identify the root cause of this in America and fix it, even if that means moderating or modifying its free-market idealogy.

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                True. Economic data shows a massive shift in wealth the past 30yrs from poor and middle class to the rich and super rich. CNBC had a special report this weekend on the 'Rise of the Super Rich', and made the observation that the richest 1% of America now control 90% of the nation's wealth. Astounding. cont...

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                fricker: funding massive tax cuts with equally massive deficit spending may or may not create growth in the short term (depending on a variety of factors). But what it guarantees is that the US Govt will have to pay a larger portion of the yearly budget on debt interest payments, decreasing government spending elsewhere (and the resulting stimulus effects). The effect on growth is net neutral.

                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                rriigghhtt, no most of it happened from 2000-2006. We've been watching carefully. The past two years, the Democrats were being Democrats. But for the six years before that, the Republicans were being Democrats too.

                KurtosisKurtosis shared this idea  · 
              • 1,461 votes
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                  233 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
                  KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                  Slacker, I never watch SNL, I don't find their humor funny. But I did watch Sarah's interview, and her debate. In a nutshell, she can spice up talking points, but flubs real questions. Compare that with Obama's Bill O'Reilly interview if you want to see how an intelligent person who has a clue handles hardball questions. GoP has gotta find serious candidates if it wants to be taken seriously.

                  KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                  It had nothing to do with McCain. It simply has to do with the fact that when asked a straightforward question about the economy and financial crisis, she had no idea how to answer and threw out a bunch of talking points connected by incomplete sentence fragments. Is it any wonder Wall St. controls the federal govt's finances when our politicians are clueless about that subject?

                  KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                  But does Sarah Palin know or understand *any* of that? From her interviews, clearly not. Why has the once smart party of ideas become the party of ignorance, know-nothingness, and naievte?

                  KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                  Elitism is having the same Wall Streeters (mostly from Goldman) running the Treasury in both Democratic and Republican administrations, and using it to cover up and/or mitigate their mistakes at taxpayer expense. Elitism is an inflationary debt-backed fiat currency that ensures a gradual, stealth transfer of wealth from the poor and middle class to bankers and creditors over decades.

                  KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                  You guys complaining about elitism don't even know what it is. Elitism is Hank Paulson making over $500B as CEO of Goldman Sachs, while GS was helping create the financial crisis, then being hired as Treasury Secretary in 2006 and using his power to prevent the standard capitalism remedy - shareholders take first losses - instead arranging a massive taxpayer baliout. Thank the GoP for that.

                  KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                  Palin is a beauty queen who wins popularity contests and excites hard-up men, but is an unserious choice for highest office in the land. She flubbed her economics questions so badly it's clear she's clueless, exactly what we do NOT want during this economic duress. Being governor of Alaska is like being Sultan of Brunei - oil pays for your citizens' needs, so you don't have to learn anything.

                • 2,476 votes
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                    86 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    Another suggestion: Everyone who voted for this suggestion, unvote for it, and reallocate your votes to the other Fair Tax suggestion that is currently ahead of this one. That should knock at least one of the Fair Tax suggestions up to or near the top.

                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    Any tax system will have flaws. Evaluating them requires adding up all the pro's and con's of the Fair Tax, doing the same with the current tax system, and comparing them fully. By that evaluation, there simply is no comparison, Fair Tax wins. Just read the book, I promise it is well worth your time. http://www.amazon.com/FairTax-Answering-Critics-Neal-Boortz/dp/0061540463

                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    Also, the Fair Tax recognizes that implementing such huge tax reform *and* decreasing govt spending (via decreased revenue) is probably too much to hope for. So their initial goal is just to get the Fair Tax implemented. After that it becomes very easy to reduce tax rates, since there is only one rate. Congress can later change that rate as necessary, to stimulate the economy or whatnot.

                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    Storm, the Fair Tax abolishes *all* Federal taxes, not just the income tax. Those have to be replaced by something, and a single, simple consumption tax that prebates all expenditures up to the cost of poverty is huge improvement over the current govt. system.

                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    There are a plethora of other benefits explained The Fair Tax: The Truth, including ensuring that illegal immigrants to pay taxes. They pay taxes on every new item they buy, but do not receive the prebate. Many more examples like this, I strongly suggest reading the book to see how smart and elegant a solution the Fair Tax is to so many of our national problems.

                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    Finally, every US Citizen, rich or poor, gets a monthly prebate check from the government that is calculated to cover the cost of poverty - eg food, housing, clothes, etc. The Fair Tax does not intend for people to pay taxes on subsistence necessities, and the prebate is the way to guarantee that objective. There are other options for doing this, but research shows the prebate is the best.

                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    Further, the Fair Tax only applies to new goods sold to end users only, not used goods, services, or parts that are destined to be used in new goods. For example, when an auto supplier make a car door and sells it to GM, it is not taxed, only the final car is.

                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    If instead employees demand and get, on a wide scale, previously with held income tax added back into their paychecks, price levels will rise by roughly that amount. So that is a trade-off that needs to be considered and researched.

                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    Depending on how the FairTax is implemented, aggregate price levels throughout the economy would remain roughly unchanged (increase by ~1%). It depends on how the savings from eliminating the income tax are reallocated. If corporations en masse reallocate them to reducing costs of final goods, instead of adding to employee income, price levels would remain roughly constant.

                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    Removing all embedded production taxes also removes all costs of compliance (tax collecting systems, accountants, lawyers, etc.). This, combined with America's historic political stability, infrastructure, and workforce would instantly make America the new global Mecca for business and manufacturing. We would supplant Asia and the emerging BRICs as the outsourcing destination of choice.

                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    The Fair Tax makes the observation that ~22% of the cost of all new goods derives from taxes and tax compliance costs embedded throughout the production process, primarily the two largest ones, payroll and income tax, but others as well. We can eradicate these taxes, and instead replace them with a 23% inclusively calculated consumption tax (30% exclusively calculated).

                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                    Absolutely. For those who haven't read the book (all you need is the latest one, Fair Tax: The Truth), the objective of the Fair Tax is to institute an irresistable economic incentive for the recapitalization of American Industry, while ensuring that every American's poverty level expenses are covered (by the prebate). Critiques tend to ignore that in favor of red herrings and strawmen only.

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                      5 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
                      KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                      Interesting idea, tax the states instead of individuals. Is there any literature on this? If so, got any links, or search terms?

                    • 352 votes
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                        119 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
                        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                        (cont) That doesn't mean the party has to embrace Ron Paul himself, but it does have to recommit to its traditional fiscal and constitutional ideals.

                        KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                        The GoP used to have 4 main constituencies:

                        1. Social conservatives
                        2. Foreign policy hawks & neoconservatives
                        3. Fiscal conservatives
                        4. Constitutional & small government libertarians

                        The past 8 years the party has completely alienated people who are primarily #3 & #4. Don't expect to become a majority party again until earnestly reincorporating them back into the platform again.

                      • 17 votes
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                          4 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
                          KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                          Excellent point. /bookmark. When I get some votes back, will add to this one.

                        • 77 votes
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                            14 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
                            KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                            Yes. As soon as I get votes back, will add to this one.

                            PS - site organizers, with the number of suggestions approaching the thousands, we need more than 10 votes. Maybe you should index our total votes to the total number of suggestions. Just a suggestion...

                          • 76 votes
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                              14 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
                              KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                              boutmuet, Net Neutrality is not about the government imposing onerous regulations on the Internet, it is about the government NOT imposing onerous regulations, while simultaneously preventing ISPs and telco's from doing that too. Same concept as the free market - it can't function without adequate regulation and oversight to prevent everything from fraud to market-distorting/destroying monopoly.

                              KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                              boutmuet, instead of repeating talking points, how about argue against my specific reasons instead? Your comment is exactly what I mean about conservatives uncritically, unquestioningly applying free-market idealogy without really thinking it through or understanding all the ramifications. It may take more than one comment, given the character limitations, but that's ok, give it a shot.

                              KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                              righty, I didn't betray the GoP, the GoP betrayed me. Fiscal conservatism, limited government, Constitutional rights, and foreign policy realism all got thrown out the window under the GOP. If you can't see that you're a mindless, unprincipled partisian. Part of conservatism is to demand accountability, or did you forget that? I would have voted for RP if my state counted write-in votes.

                              KurtosisKurtosis shared this idea  · 
                            • 909 votes
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                                61 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
                                KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                                Is it really surprising that the GoP won in 1994 with a coalition of small-government fiscal conservatives and social conservatives, but a few cycles after abandoning the the former the party is now completely out of power? Hmm, maybe there's a lesson there...

                              • 62 votes
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                                  22 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
                                  KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

                                  Agreed. Energy independence is quickly becoming the national security priority #1, not just for America, but for Europe and other countries that find themselves at the mercy of Putin, Chavez, or an unstable MidEast. Regardless whether man is causing climate change or we are just being fooled by random patterns in an extremely complex climate system, energy is clearly a national security issue.

                                • 32 votes
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                                    7 comments  ·  General  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
                                    KurtosisKurtosis commented  · 

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